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The local state and federal levels of government in australia

It outlined the nature of the relationship between these two levels of government and what responsibilities they would share or for which they would be solely accountable. This complex system intends that the three levels of government are best able to look after the interests of the nation, the State and the community.

Federal The federal government was created by the Constitution of Australia, which came into effect in 1901 at the time of Federation. The structure and powers of the government were outlined in the Constitution. Similar to the Westminster System of government, the Commonwealth of Australia is divided into three separate branches: The legislature is the arm of the government that makes new laws and also amends existing laws.

The federal government comprises whichever party holds the majority of seats in the Lower House.

It is within the federal parliament that an amendment to the Constitution can be proposed, but it then has to go to a public vote referendum before it can be accepted. It also uses these taxes to finance areas which it is required to control in accordance with the Constitution, the Commonwealth government has the power to make laws for 39 areas, which include: On these matters defined in the Constitution, the Commonwealth has the power to overrule State laws.

The executive is where the law is put into effect. On a Commonwealth level, Australia's head of State is the Queen. Unlike the Cabinet, the Executive Council appears in the Constitution. It comprises all ministers not just the senior ministers which serve in the Cabinet that have been nominated by the Prime Minister.

All members of the Executive Council have the title 'The Honourable. The highest level of the judiciary in the nation is the High Court of Australia. State The Constitution of Australia provided that each State and Territory retain its own government and parliament.

Each State also operates under its own constitution and follows the structure of a legislature, executive and judiciary system in a similar way to the Commonwealth government.

The Constitution of Australia, however, provides that the Constitution of the State is subject to that of the Commonwealth. With the exception of Queensland, which only has a Lower House, all States have two Houses of parliament. The head of a State government is called the premier and he or she assists in advising the Queen to appoint the State governor. The head of a Territory government is referred to as Chief Minister and rather than governors, the Territories of Australia have 'Administrators' who are appointed by the governor-general.

See image 2 State legislative powers are plenary. This means that States may pass legislation on any matter subject to the Commonwealth Constitution. These include roads and public transport, sport and recreation, law enforcement and consumer affairs. There is nothing to prevent States from raising their own income taxes.

  • In rural areas, however, where local governments can often encompass a number of distinct towns or villages, these areas can be known as shires, municipalities, district councils or boroughs;
  • The executive is where the law is put into effect;
  • It comprises all ministers not just the senior ministers which serve in the Cabinet that have been nominated by the Prime Minister;
  • State parliaments in turn gave councils the task of looking after the particular needs of their local communities;
  • It is within the federal parliament that an amendment to the Constitution can be proposed, but it then has to go to a public vote referendum before it can be accepted.

Over 60 years ago, however, States agreed to forgo income tax in return for Commonwealth grants. Local The first local government was established in 1840 by the South Australian government in Adelaide.

Despite going unrecognised in the Constitution, there are 722 local government bodies also known as local councils in Australia today, with each one having been established by its State or Territory government.

Instead, it delegates these localised responsibilities to a department of its Territorial government. The areas which local governments are responsible for have several different titles which differ among States. All local government areas for urban and suburban regions are referred to as 'cities,' such as Brisbane City Council.

In rural areas, however, where local governments can often encompass a number of distinct towns or villages, these areas can be known as shires, municipalities, district councils or boroughs.

Despite the power of local governments being subject to their State or Territory government, local governments can make some decisions through laws called by-laws.

Levels of government

Their powers usually extend to matters of local or community-based importance such as swimming pools, public libraries, construction and maintenance of local roads, town planning and building supervision.

See image 3 The finances of local governments are often supplied through the payment of council rates taxes from those who own land. In 2003-2004, around 37. Local governments do not have the equivalent of a judiciary as do the State and federal governments.

They do, however, have a system similar to a legislature and executive branches. Most local governments have a mayor and between five to 15 councillors, all of whom are elected by the people of the area over whom they will preside. In some cases, the mayor is elected by his or her fellow councillors.