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Influential figures in fashion claire mccardell and madeleine vionnet

Claire McCardell modeling her own design. Claire McCardell on the way to Paris. Claire incorporated the bias cut into her designs, both for aesthetic as well as functional effects.

Altman- before she gets a job at a knitwear company. Shortly after the move to Townley and just a month before the spring showing in 1931, Robert Turk tragically drowned while swimming, forcing Claire to finish the collection. She recalled how she dealt with the opportunistic crisis: In 1934, Claire launches her first innovation: It was fresh, spirited, young.

  • The complexity of her construction techniques meant that her designs came alive only when worn or draped on the stand;
  • Miss McCardell believes in belting gathers in at the waist rather than cutting the fabric to fit.

It was made for healthy, long-legged girls who were going places and wanted clothes they could move in. The Monastic dress gave American fashion a new flexibility that it has never lost.

McCARDELL, Claire

The company closes later in the year. Soon after, she will leave Hattie Carnegie and work briefly for lower-cost manufacturer Win-Sum, before rejoining the reopened Townley—the surprise outcome of a chance meeting on an elevator with her former employer and his new partner Adolph Klein. She will stay with Townly till her death.

  1. Offering sportswear and daywear that were at once appropriate for the office, cocktail hour, and leisure, McCardell eliminated the fuss, decoration, and strict categorization so often encountered in women's apparel of the time. True to her problem-solving approach to fashion design, McCardell used humble fabrics such as cotton calico, denim, jersey, and even synthetics, effectively ennobling everyday materials by way of thoughtful design and deftly executed construction.
  2. These elongated the silhouette, which was first blurred and then brought into relief as the wearer's movements caused the swathes of fabric to shift and form anew. Futurist Influences Such effects were only enhanced as the wearer moved, and Vionnet's interest in contemporary art, and in particular futurism, served to develop this exploration of movement as a further expression of modernism.
  3. Manmade fibers, too, were a source of innovation.
  4. True to her problem-solving approach to fashion design, McCardell used humble fabrics such as cotton calico, denim, jersey, and even synthetics, effectively ennobling everyday materials by way of thoughtful design and deftly executed construction. It demonstrates Vionnet's search during this period of her career for new ways to push the boundaries of the fabric while maintaining tight control over the ultimate hang of the garment.
  5. High fashion was too expensive for working people, and madeleine vionnet, claire mccardell and rei kawakubo fashion institute of technology, new york. Putting 3,000 people out of work madeleine vionnet jet set sewing julie eilber is a fashion historian and sewing american designer claire mccardell.

The designer was someone kept in the back room. It was just acknowledgment of her work. Unable to get proper shoes for her presentations due to wartime restrictions, she uses Capezio ballet slippers, starting a craze for dance flats.

  • The Monastic was so resoundingly popular that it was copied by competitors into the next decade and remained in her own line in updated versions for almost twenty years;
  • In Vionnet's hands its light drapes created a shimmering cocoon reminiscent of lingerie;
  • She viewed couture as a testing ground for the new identities that the twentieth century created.

Claire comes up with another innovation because of the fabric shortish: The modern woman could both be chic and do the cooking. He would have been very happy if she gave that up.

Daring Designs

It was her first love. When Claire wins her first Coty Award, Norman Norell, who received the inaugural prize the year before, will say that she should have had that first: Her most lasting impression, however, would continue to be in design.

Madeleine Vionnet

Irving Penn for Vogue, 1950: The clothes were functional and styled basically, following the lines of the fabrics rather than molding anything to the body. Miss McCardell believes in belting gathers in at the waist rather than cutting the fabric to fit. Claire McCardell designs till 1952 evening ensemble, 1937.