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Life of susan b anthony and her contribution to the daughter of temperance

Susan taught for ten years in district schools, private academies, and families, concluding her career as head of the female department in the academy at Canajoharie, New York, from 1846 to 1849. This work had a lasting effect on her ideas as a reformer and on her views about equality. She approached working women not as a philanthropist curious about their plight but as a veteran of their tribulations. At Canajoharie she delivered her first speech to a meeting of the Daughters of Temperance.

The New York State Temperance Society 1852 In 1851 Anthony met Elizabeth Cady Stantonand over the next year the two women discovered the sort of liberating partnership they could forge. Their ideas were converging.

Susan B. Anthony Biography

Beginning as an agent for this society, Anthony became a full-time reformer. On the road most of each year for the next four decades, she avoided keeping house and supported herself by work for her political causes.

This willingness to live in perpetual motion made her a perfect partner in the 1850s for Stanton, whose children and household tied her down. At age seventy-four, she insisted on repeating that feat in the service of a suffrage amendment to the state constitution.

The political methods that Anthony worked out in New York set the pattern she would follow nationally for the rest of her life. Her objectives were to change laws, and she took her arguments to the public through lectures, pamphlets, subscription newspapers, and personal appeals for signatures on petitions. Each year had its cycle: At Albany she would schedule the best speakers in a large meeting to coincide with the start of the legislative session in order to attract politicians and the press.

As the movement gained importance, she could schedule hearings as well. She did not, however, build organizations or solicit memberships.

The Thirteenth Amendment and subsequent debate about securing citizenship for freed slaves introduced Anthony and her co-workers to the potential for sweeping change through amendment to the national Constitution. With a lecture on universal suffrage, she worked her way east. Hopes for universal suffrage from Congress bound former abolitionists together in the American Equal Rights Association, established in 1866.

As its corresponding secretary Anthony oversaw petitions to Congress and coordinated several campaigns to amend state constitutions. She divided her time in 1867 between campaigns in New York and Kansas.

Kansas voters defeated proposals for African-American and woman suffrage, but the campaign itself exposed profound differences within the equal rights coalition and drove a wedge among woman suffragists that would divide them until the end of the century.

  • Incidentally, Quakers also believe in the equality of men and women;
  • In 1853 Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the Women's State Temperance Society with the goal of petitioning the State legislature to pass a law limiting the sale of liquor;
  • They received far fewer wages than men for equal work.

Grasping for any support, Anthony accepted the assistance of George Francis Train, showman, financier, Democrat, and blatant racist, to complete the tour of Kansas.

Moreover, while traveling home with Train, she and Stanton accepted his offer of capital to launch a newspaper. In one sense, Anthony simply separated her cause from dependence on Republican leadership to test its political appeal. But she and Stanton crafted their move in terms that pitted the rights of women against the rights of freedmen and claimed a higher right for themselves.

Although Anthony advocated a sixteenth amendment for woman suffrage as early as 1868, the strategy of the NWSA remained uncertain and subject to change until 1875. National suffragists sought legislative and judicial tests of the theory that the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments together had, in fact, granted women the right to vote by linking citizenship—which women enjoyed—to the franchise.

Through direct action in local elections dozens of women created test cases, and, on the initiative of Victoria Woodhullthe NWSA petitioned for an act of Congress to implement what the amendments had established in principle. Within weeks she was arrested for violating federal law.

Convicted by the judge, without a poll of the jury that heard her case, and fined, Anthony was not ordered to jail and thus could not take her case to the Supreme Court on a writ of habeas corpus.

  1. Serious conflicts about basic values threatened the goal of sustaining a single national organization for the cause. Because Susan's father, Daniel Anthony, believed so strongly in the Quaker ways, Susan was greatly influenced and had many opportunities that many other young women did not have.
  2. Although this was fourteen years after the death of Susan, this Amendment was often referred to as the "Susan B. How did this person's upbringing influence his or her contributions?
  3. In what way did technology make an impact on this person's life or contribution?
  4. Anthony, susan b 15 february 1820 was born susan brownell anthony in adams, massachusetts, the daughter ida husted harper added vol 3 to her life and work. Anthony was brought up a Quaker.

She never paid the fine. In another case, Minor v. Happersett 1874the Court ruled that under the Constitution the states still could determine the political rights of women. In response to this ruling, Anthony revived the proposal for a constitutional amendment in 1876 and sustained a national campaign for the next decade. When an amendment finally reached the Senate floor in 1886, it lost decisively.

From October through December and from February until the planting season, Anthony stayed on the lecture circuit, booked into towns and cities of every size. In January she convened her followers in Washington to make their case to Congress.

Susan B. Anthony, Temperance Fighter

Never comfortable as a lecturer, she labored hard to become adequate in the job, and eventually her reputation drew audiences that her style might not.

She came to personify the demand for woman suffrage to most Americans. As her fame mounted, Anthony used the power it gave her to link suffragists with groups of women organized for other purposes.

Stanton presided over the new organization from 1890 to 1892, when Anthony replaced her. Anthony served until her eightieth birthday in 1900. Without diminishing the contribution she continued to make toward public acceptance of suffrage, it is fair to say that by the 1890s Anthony was not up to meeting the challenges arising among suffragists themselves.

  • Lucy stone dedicated her life to improving the at odds with susan b anthony reformer who devoted her life to women's suffrage and the temperance;
  • Anthony was convinced by her work for temperance that women needed the vote if they were to influence public affairs;
  • She continued to be active in her cause and in her various organizations until her death on March 13, 1906.

Growth and merger had introduced new political cultures into the movement, often more conservative and more wedded to building strong state suffrage societies primed for local action. Pressure for campaigns to win suffrage by state legislation or referendum escalated after 1890, straining resources and diverting attention from the federal amendment. Serious conflicts about basic values threatened the goal of sustaining a single national organization for the cause.

Veneration of Susan B.

Life of susan b anthony and her contribution to the daughter of temperance

But she did not really give up travel: South Dakota for seven months in 1890; Chicago for four months in 1893; the South for two months in 1895 and again in 1903; California in 1895, most of 1896, and then again in 1905; London in 1899; Berlin in 1904; Washington every year; and plenty of short trips in between.

Between 1881 and 1886, working alongside Stanton and Matilda Joslyn Gageshe produced three volumes of the History of Woman Suffrage, corralling contributors from each state and tracking down sources. Anthony 1898based on massive archives that had accumulated in the attic.

  • Anthony was convinced by her work for temperance that women needed the vote if they were to influence public affairs;
  • Anthony's brothers Daniel and Merritt were anti-slavery activists in Kansas;
  • South Dakota for seven months in 1890; Chicago for four months in 1893; the South for two months in 1895 and again in 1903; California in 1895, most of 1896, and then again in 1905; London in 1899; Berlin in 1904; Washington every year; and plenty of short trips in between.

With Harper she then produced a fourth volume of the History 1902. Anthony donated her books and scrapbooks to the Library of Congress and personally shipped thousands of volumes of the History and the biography to academic and public libraries. Holland and Ann D. Not included there in their entirety are scrapbooks at the Library of Congress, a remarkable record of lifetime attention to political and social issues.

  1. Information and articles about susan b anthony, she devoted her life to not only fighting she continued her work with the temperance movement while. Hearing their discussions helped Susan form her strong views on slavery, women's rights, and temperance the avoidance of alcohol.
  2. But she did not really give up travel. Jane addams and progressive era school teacher, daughter of a farmer, co-founded the national women's suffrage association with susan b anthony in 1869.
  3. Lucy stone dedicated her life to improving the at odds with susan b anthony reformer who devoted her life to women's suffrage and the temperance.

A valuable selection of documents appears in Ellen C. Correspondence, Writings, Speeches rev. Ida Husted Harper added vol. DuBois, Feminism and Suffrage 1978is the basic work.

Rochester, New York 1984. Though obituaries appeared in hundreds of papers, the principal ones are those from Rochester, New York, 13 Mar. Online Resources Not for Ourselves Alone: Companion web site to the film by Ken Burns and Paul Barnes.