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A study of the american dream of 1960s and today

Historically the Dream originated in the mystique regarding frontier life. As the Governor of Virginia noted in 1774, the Americans "for ever imagine the Lands further off are still better than those upon which they are already settled".

He added that, "if they attained Paradise, they would move on if they heard of a better place farther west". They welcomed the political freedoms in the New World, and the lack of a hierarchical or aristocratic society that determined the ceiling for individual aspirations.

One of them explained: The German emigrant comes into a country free from the despotism, privileged orders and monopolies, intolerable taxes, and constraints in matters of belief and conscience. Everyone can travel and settle wherever he pleases. No passport is demanded, no police mingles in his affairs or hinders his movements.

American Dream

Fidelity and merit are the only sources of honor here. The rich stand on the same footing as the poor; the scholar is not a mug above the most humble mechanics; no German ought to be ashamed to pursue any occupation. Nor are there nobility, privileged orders, or standing armies to weaken the physical and moral power of the people, nor are there swarms of public functionaries to devour in idleness credit for.

Above all, there are no princes and corrupt courts representing the so-called divine 'right of birth. Thus was born the California Dream of instant success. Brands noted a study of the american dream of 1960s and today in the years after the Gold Rush, the California Dream spread across the nation: The old American Dream.

The new dream was the dream of instant wealth, won in a twinkling by audacity and good luck. He stressed the process—the moving frontier line—and the impact it had on pioneers going through the process.

He also stressed results; especially that American democracy was the primary result, along with egalitarianisma lack of interest in high cultureand violence. It came out of the American forest, and it gained new strength each time it touched a new frontier," said Turner. The frontier had no need for standing armies, established churches, aristocrats or nobles, nor for landed gentry who controlled most of the land and charged heavy rents.

Frontier land was free for the taking. Turner first announced his thesis in a paper entitled " The Significance of the Frontier in American History ", delivered to the American Historical Association in 1893 in Chicago. He won wide acclaim among historians and intellectuals. Turner elaborated on the theme in his advanced history lectures and in a series of essays published over the next 25 years, published along with his initial paper as The Frontier in American History.

But there has been also the American dream, that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for every man, with opportunity for each according to his ability or achievement. It is a difficult dream for the European upper classes to interpret adequately, and too many of us ourselves have grown weary and mistrustful of it.

It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position. The American dream, that has lured tens of millions of all nations to our shores in the past century has not been a dream of merely material plenty, though that has doubtlessly counted heavily.

It has been much more than that. It has been a dream of being able to grow to fullest development as man and woman, unhampered by the barriers which had slowly been erected in the older civilizations, unrepressed by social orders which had developed for the benefit of classes rather than for the simple human being of any and every class.

  • It is the opportunity to make individual choices without the prior restrictions that limited people according to their class, caste, religion, race, or ethnicity;
  • Even so, immigrants continued to flood the borders, partly to flee the life they had in Europe and partly in pursuit of that idea of the American Dream;
  • In these polls, a majority of Americans consistently reported that for their family, the American Dream is more about spiritual happiness than material goods;
  • For the first time the working class could afford a luxury item like a car, and freedom took on a whole new meaning;
  • These examples show that American citizens and society in general very well know and live "The American Dream" of a free country administered by a "government of the people, by the people and for the people" that they can influence for the better.

John Winthrop also wrote about this term called, American Exceptionalism. This ideology refers to the idea that Americans are the chosen ones, and that they are the light. Scott Fitzgeraldin his 1925 classic, The Great Gatsbysatirized or ridiculed materialism in the chase for the American dream.

For example, Jay Gatsby's death mirrors the American Dream's demise, reflecting the pessimism of modern-day Americans. The two friends George and Lennie dream of their own piece of land with a ranchso they can "live off the fatta the lan'" and just enjoy a better life. The book later shows that not everyone can achieve the American Dream, thus proving by contradiction it is not possible for all, although it is possible to achieve for a few.

  1. Yet another point of view is the outside perspective from the devastated European countries which looked up to the American fortitude and richness after the Second World War. Banks gave home loans to anyone with a pen to sign and for a brief moment, the American Dream seemed too big to fail amidst the euphoria of it all.
  2. The American Dream has always been equated with freedom and material prosperity, two concepts that surged in pockets of society during decades like the 1950s and 1980s and according to critics has been retreating ever since.
  3. Everyone can travel and settle wherever he pleases. The frontier had no need for standing armies, established churches, aristocrats or nobles, nor for landed gentry who controlled most of the land and charged heavy rents.
  4. While no government program can provide it, big government can take it away. While the Dream is something that no politician can guarantee, the wrong politician can kill it.

A lot of people follow the American Dream to achieve a greater chance of becoming rich. Some posit that the ease of achieving the American Dream changes with technological advances, availability of infrastructure and information, government regulations, state of the economy, and with the evolving cultural values of American demographics.

Similarly, in 1971 Hunter S. Thompson depicted in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey Into the Heart of the American Dream a dark psychedelic reflection of the concept—successfully illustrated only in wasted pop-culture excess. George Carlin famously wrote the joke "it's called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it". The American dream, we now know, is a lie. We will all be sacrificed.

  • Junk bonds and hand-made suits, big shoulder pads, big hair and TV shows like Dallas, Dynasty and Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous defined what was important — suddenly having it all was the American Dream;
  • Chinese Dream can be interpreted as the collective consciousness of Chinese people during the era of social transformation and economic progress;
  • Most Americans predict that achieving the Dream with fair means will become increasingly difficult for future generations;
  • Furthermore, most support programs make special efforts to help minorities get ahead;
  • However, at hand are questions greater than who will win an election.

The virus of corporate abuse - the perverted belief that only corporate profit matters - has spread to outsource our jobs, cut the budgets of our schools, close our libraries, and plague our communities with foreclosures and unemployment. The American Dream, and the sometimes dark response to it, has been a long-standing theme in American film. For example, Easy Rider 1969directed by Dennis Hoppershows the characters making a pilgrimage in search of "the true America" in terms of the hippie movement, drug use, and communal lifestyles.

Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream. It was this interpretation of the American Dream for a young black man that helped establish his statewide and a study of the american dream of 1960s and today reputations.

This study using medians instead of averages that underestimate the range and show less stark distinctions between the top and bottom tiers makes it abundantly clear that we have less.

Your circumstances at birth—specifically, what your parents do for a living—are an even bigger factor in how far you get in life than we had previously realized. Generations of Americans considered the United States to be a land of opportunity.

This research raises some sobering questions about that image. According to The Dream, this includes the opportunity for one's children to grow up and receive a good education and career without artificial barriers. It is the opportunity to make individual choices without the prior restrictions that limited people according to their class, caste, religion, race, or ethnicity.

Immigrants to the United States sponsored ethnic newspapers in their own language; the editors typically promoted the American Dream.

  1. The nineties was the era of the personal computer, and soon the internet would give rise to the new Gold Rush as entrepreneurs fought to cash in on the dot. For example, Jay Gatsby's death mirrors the American Dream's demise, reflecting the pessimism of modern-day Americans.
  2. Frontier land was free for the taking.
  3. Heavy government military spending had revived the economy and while the other countries involved in World War II had to rebuild their bombed and ruined cities the USA were spared from the destruction at home.
  4. They enjoy financial security, superior education, and the Obama children have every opportunity to prosper as much or more than their parents.

For many in both the working class and the middle class, upward mobility has served as the heart and soul of the American Dream, the prospect of "betterment" and to "improve one's lot" for oneself and one's children much of what this country is all about. A fundamental aspect of the American Dream has always been the expectation that the next generation should do better than the previous generation.

In these polls, a majority of Americans consistently reported that for their family, the American Dream is more about spiritual happiness a study of the american dream of 1960s and today material goods. Majorities state that working hard is the most important element for getting ahead. However, an increasing minority stated that hard work and determination does not guarantee success.

Most Americans predict that achieving the Dream with fair means will become increasingly difficult for future generations. They are increasingly pessimistic about the opportunity for the working class to get ahead; on the other hand, they are increasingly optimistic about the opportunities available to poor people and to new immigrants. Furthermore, most support programs make special efforts to help minorities get ahead. Research published in 2013 shows that the US provides, alongside the United Kingdom and Spain, the least economic mobility of any of 13 rich, democratic countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Research in 2006 found that among high-income countries for which comparable estimates are available, only the United Kingdom had a lower rate of mobility than the United States.

Wilkinsonhave noted that the American dream is better realized in Denmark, which is ranked as having the highest social mobility in the OECD. The first was the "Dream of Abundance" offering a cornucopia of material goods to all Americans, making them proud to be the richest society on earth.

The second was the "Dream of a Democracy of Goods" whereby everyone had access to the same products regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, or class, thereby challenging the aristocratic norms of the rest of the world whereby only the rich or well-connected are granted access to luxury. The "Dream of Freedom of Choice" with its ever-expanding variety of good allowed people to fashion their own particular lifestyle.

Finally, the "Dream of Novelty", in which ever-changing fashions, new models, and unexpected new products broadened the consumer experience in terms of purchasing skills and awareness of the market, and challenged the conservatism of traditional society and a study of the american dream of 1960s and today, and even politics.

Ownby acknowledges that the dreams of the new consumer culture radiated out from the major cities, but notes that they quickly penetrated the most rural and most isolated areas, such as rural Mississippi.

Ownby demonstrates that poor black Mississippians shared in the new consumer culture, both inside Mississippi, and it motivated the more ambitious to move to Memphis or Chicago. Looking at American business, religious missionaries, philanthropies, Hollywoodlabor unions and Washington agencies, she says they saw their mission not in catering to foreign elites but instead reaching the world's masses in democratic fashion.

In the emerging litany of the American dream what historian Daniel Boorstin later termed a "democracy of things" would disprove both Malthus 's predictions of scarcity and Marx 's of class conflict. Italian women saw a model for their own emancipation from second class status in their patriarchal society.

Her Conservative Party called for more home ownership: To most people ownership means first and foremost a home of their own. We should like in time to improve on existing legislation with a realistic grants scheme to assist first-time buyers of cheaper homes.

The newly independent Russian media idealized America and endorsed shock therapy for the economy.

How has the American Dream evolved?

In 2010 his administration announced a plan for widespread home ownership: Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putinworried about his nation's very low birth ratesaid he hoped home ownership will inspire Russians "to have more babies". It is used by journalists, government officials and activists to describe the aspiration of individual self-improvement in Chinese society. Although the phrase has been used previously by Western journalists and scholars, [79] [80] a translation of a New York Times article written by the American journalist Thomas Friedman"China Needs Its Own Dream", has been credited with popularizing the concept in China.

It stresses entrepreneurship and glorifies a generation of self-made men and women in post- reform China. Chinese Dream can be interpreted as the collective consciousness of Chinese people during the era of social transformation and economic progress.

  • It has been much more than that;
  • Even so, immigrants continued to flood the borders, partly to flee the life they had in Europe and partly in pursuit of that idea of the American Dream;
  • It meant that he could not be jailed without formal charges and a speedy trial by a jury of his peers, that he had the right to confront his accusers, and that government could not possess his hearth and home without just reason and compensation;
  • Everyone can travel and settle wherever he pleases.

The government hoped to create a revitalized China, while promoting innovation and technology to restore the international prestige of China. In this light, Chinese Dream, like American exceptionalismis a nationalistic concept as well.