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Susan glaspell a jury of her peers essay

The story, which she adapted from her one-act play Trifles in 1917, has attracted the attention of feminist scholars for its treatment of gender-related themes.

  • The rising action occurs as the characters go about the house looking for clues;
  • Bound by rigid stereotypes and the inability to step into Minnie's shoes to solve the crime, the men who are supposed to be the primary investigators in the case, miss all of the clues and are unknowingly outwitted by their wives.

Wright's story is told indirectly through a conversation between Martha Hale—whose husband discovered the body of John Wright—and Mrs. Peters, the wife of the local sheriff.

The sheriff asks Mrs. Hale to accompany them to the Wright's house so she can keep his wife company while the men investigate the murder scene.

Thrown together by circumstance, the women form an immediate bond as they begin gathering some of Minnie's belongings to bring to her in her jail cell. Left alone in Minnie's kitchen, however, the two women begin discovering their own clues about Minnie's possible motive for killing her husband. Peters begin noticing details about Minnie's life that escape the notice of their husbands.

“A Jury of Her Peers” by Susan Glaspell

They notice Minnie's desolate, isolated existence, her broken furniture, the rundown kitchen where she had to cook, and the ragged clothing she was forced to wear because of her husband's miserly insensitivity. Eventually the two women stumble across two clues that piece Minnie's case together. They spot the crooked stitching on one of the quilts Minnie was working on, speculating that she must have been upset while trying to complete the project.

  1. Peters, the wife of the local sheriff.
  2. The conflict intensifies as the women begin to understand why Mrs.
  3. Critics believe that Glaspell, who based this story on a real murder trial in which women were not allowed to serve as jurors, created a jury of those female peers in her story to mete out their own form of justice.
  4. Most of her forty-three short stories fell into the genre of local color writing, the staple of many magazines at the turn of the twentieth century. Peters begin noticing details about Minnie's life that escape the notice of their husbands.
  5. Thrown together by circumstance, the women form an immediate bond as they begin gathering some of Minnie's belongings to bring to her in her jail cell. They even went so far as to hide the most significant clue for Mrs.

The two women also find Minnie's cherished canary strangled and carefully tucked away in a box inside her sewing basket. After discovering these clues, the two women begin talking about how Minnie, once sociable and cheerful, evolved into an introverted, lonely woman after marrying her silent, cold husband. Both women also notice the broken hinge on the bird cage, speculating that John Wright might have strangled Minnie's canary, much the way he killed his wife's spirit with his overbearing manner.

Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers” Essay

Empathizing with Minnie, the women decide not to tell their husbands about the results of their own investigation. Instead, they repair the erratic stitching on Minnie's quilt and concoct a story about the canary's disappearance, blaming a runaway cat.

In silent collusion, Mrs. Peters cover up the clues that reveal Minnie's motive, quietly acquitting Minnie from wrongdoing without their husbands' knowledge.

  1. After discovering these clues, the two women begin talking about how Minnie, once sociable and cheerful, evolved into an introverted, lonely woman after marrying her silent, cold husband. Thrown together by circumstance, the women form an immediate bond as they begin gathering some of Minnie's belongings to bring to her in her jail cell.
  2. The rising action occurs as the characters go about the house looking for clues. Wright of Minnie Foster, though not present in the single scene the story tells of are also discussed and described.
  3. The conflict is, of course, the murder of John Wright; or, to be more specific, the finding of clues to solve the murder of John Wright. Wright of Minnie Foster, though not present in the single scene the story tells of are also discussed and described.

Critics believe that Glaspell, who based this story on a real murder trial in which women were not allowed to serve as jurors, created a jury of those female peers in her story to mete out their own form of justice. The men in the story also view their wives as the weaker sex, only valuable as overseers of the domestic arena—an area the men consider insignificant.

  • Empathizing with Minnie, the women decide not to tell their husbands about the results of their own investigation;
  • The climax of the story occurs when the women silently decide not to tell the men about their findings when they had the chance;
  • Hale to accompany them to the Wright's house so she can keep his wife company while the men investigate the murder scene;
  • The climax of the story occurs when the women silently decide not to tell the men about their findings when they had the chance.

Bound by rigid stereotypes and the inability to step into Minnie's shoes to solve the crime, the men who are supposed to be the primary investigators in the case, miss all of the clues and are unknowingly outwitted by their wives.

After the two women solve the case, they silently decide to protect one of their own, ultimately becoming the true investigators, the judge, and the jury on Minnie's case.

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Critical Reception A winner of the Pulitzer Prize for her drama Alison's House, Glaspell attained much critical acclaim as a playwright and as an important contributor to the development of modern American drama. Her short fiction, however, was often considered regional, sentimental, and full of formulaic plots.

  • After the two women solve the case, they silently decide to protect one of their own, ultimately becoming the true investigators, the judge, and the jury on Minnie's case;
  • The characters are also introduced little by little;
  • Left alone in Minnie's kitchen, however, the two women begin discovering their own clues about Minnie's possible motive for killing her husband;
  • After the two women solve the case, they silently decide to protect one of their own, ultimately becoming the true investigators, the judge, and the jury on Minnie's case;
  • The conflict intensifies as the women begin to understand why Mrs;
  • The conflict is, of course, the murder of John Wright; or, to be more specific, the finding of clues to solve the murder of John Wright.

Most of her forty-three short stories fell into the genre of local color writing, the staple of many magazines at the turn of the twentieth century.

In 1912, a reviewer for the Boston Evening Transcript praised Glaspell, saying: