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My experience as a medical assistant essay

I expect this externship to give me more insight into exactly what being a Family Physician entails in a very practical way: Tuesday, May 14 Working in the Hospital The first two days of my externship were spent in the hospital rather than the clinic.

This was a good way to start off because I have only had experience with Family Medicine in an outpatient setting, and I wasn't quite sure what to expect from an inpatient setting. My day began early, in a small conference room where the residents met to discuss their patients. Two of the residents, who were on night float that week, filled everyone in on any overnight changes, and the group decided on the next steps for each patient. I enjoyed listening to the residents discuss their patients and I was impressed by their knowledge.

Though I am only four years away from being at their level of training, I realized how much of a gap that really was. It was daunting, but encouraging, taking that glimpse into the future and marveling at the effectiveness of medical school and residency training.

After the morning meeting concluded, it was time my experience as a medical assistant essay round. I saw about 10 patients in the two days I spent in the hospital. The thing that stood out the most was the wide range of patients Family Physicians treat.

Making it in medicine

I observed an examination of a newborn less than two hours old immediately followed by an abdominal exam of an elderly woman with a bowel obstruction. Later that day, we saw a young man with type 1 diabetes and abdominal pain, with whom we had to address some social and family issues. I also watched a resident admit a new patient and observed my first procedure: I was included in interdisciplinary rounds, where a Family Medicine resident presented a patient who needed multiple concerns addressed.

Pharmacy, physical therapy, and behavioral psychology representatives gave their input, and I was impressed by how they worked together to ensure completeness and continuity of care. In addition to experiencing patient care in the hospital, I also got insight into how Family Medicine functions within the inpatient setting and how they interact with other specialties and caregivers. It does not always go smoothly, but being there to see it and watch doctors work through complicated cases was interesting.

I was surprised and impressed by the "team effort" philosophy I observed in the Family Medicine faculty and residents, as well as the wide range of knowledge needed to treat a wide variety of patients. Friday, May 17 Teaching and Shadowing The remainder of my first week was spent at the outpatient clinic adjacent to the hospital, where I will be for the majority of this externship. Here, I get a chance to shadow almost the entire faculty, which allows me to see a variety of different styles and approaches.

Even in the first three days, I've taken note of many different ways physicians interact with their patients.

Medical student reflects on positive internship experience

The Family Medicine environment is especially interesting in this respect, as physicians often have long-term relationships with their patients and can tailor their approach to the personality and needs of the individual patient.

The physicians I've shadowed thus far seem to have a strong emphasis on patient education, which is something I can appreciate as a former teacher.

  • Scheduling patient appointments Maintaining medical records, and billing and coding information for insurance Preparing patients for examination Helping physicians with patient examinations Taking and recording vital signs, such as blood pressure Drawing blood Preparing blood samples for laboratory tests Giving patients injections or medications as directed by a physician in some states If you plan on becoming a medical assistant, you can expect to spend your shifts doing these types of job duties;
  • Part of the reason primary care appeals to me is that I enjoy people, and I enjoy teaching;
  • Why do you want to become a physician?
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  • In particular, I learned a lot about which screenings and immunizations are appropriate for which patient populations and how to keep up with changing guidelines.

It took me a while to develop my "personality" in front of the classroom, and I did so through experience and modeling myself after the many great teachers I learned from and worked with. After a while, all these experiences began to tie together and I found what was comfortable and effective for me. I believe my development as a physician will be a similar process, and I am excited for the chance to start forming the foundation of my physician personality.

Working with a variety of people here will help jump start that process. More specifically, something I learned while shadowing this week was to set expectations for my time with a doctor.

  1. Sample answers I love to help people, and I always wanted to work in healthcare. Did I know how to do a physical exam or interview the patient?
  2. But I also understand the value in this practice, as sometimes the best way to improve is to see yourself make a mistake. I am eager to continue this sort of research as I pursue my medical career.
  3. It was daunting, but encouraging, taking that glimpse into the future and marveling at the effectiveness of medical school and residency training.
  4. I knew Family Medicine Physicians saw a wide variety of patients, but I think it is difficult to appreciate just how varied their schedules are until you actually spend an entire day in the clinic. I also enjoyed keeping this journal and would recommend that future students do so as well.

This is something that I would recommend to a student who does this externship in the future, but I believe it can be applied almost universally as a medical student trying to learn in an effective manner. I realized that many of the physicians weren't quite sure where I was at as a learner. Did I know how to do a physical exam or interview the patient?

What do I want to learn, and what do I want to get better at? These are all important questions to make sure you answer for yourself, as a learner, and express to your teacher so you're on the same page. Observing other people work can be a great learning tool, but a hands-on approach will be more effective in the long run.

Making clear what you know how to do, what you need help with, and what you have no clue about is a great way to set expectations for your time with a physician and make sure you get the most out of your learning experience.

Once I realized that, I had a more interactive and productive time in clinic, interviewing patients, and practicing aspects of the physical exam. In reality, however, the learning process for a physician never stops. Lunchtime conferences happen almost daily here, covering a wide variety of topics, presented by faculty members.

While some of the more clinically-oriented presentations have been over my head, it has still been valuable to watch the faculty members teach and hear the questions and thought processes of the other physicians.

In addition to conferences, I have had the chance to sit in on some of the seminars for residents, which have covered topics ranging from teaching medical students to health care reform.

These sessions are informative but also give me some insight into the daily lives of the residents and the responsibilities they have to complete their program. I was able to get more actively involved in the session about teaching medical students, as I, of course, am one.

The residents practiced addressing patient concerns with me and using techniques to ensure that the medical student is picking up information and getting feedback that they can use. My teaching background allowed me to offer them a few tips as well, and I was glad to contribute something to the session. For students who may do this externship in the future, I would recommend trying to engage in these learning opportunities just as you would during patient care.

While some of the information was too advanced for a first year medical student, there are still things you can pick up from each conference. I appreciate the team approach to learning here and I think the collaborative environment sets a good example for medical students to see what education looks like after medical school is over. Friday, May 24 Communication Because patient care is my focus during my time in the clinic, it is easy to overlook all the logistics that go along with running a well-organized outpatient facility.

At this clinic, there are people working at the front desk, MAs that have the initial interaction with the patients, and nurses who help to coordinate care and triage phone calls into the clinic. Faculty and residents see many patients each day, and in such a large clinic it is remarkable that things generally stay on schedule and well-run. It involves coordination and communication between the entire staff to keep things moving efficiently. The practice is organized around electronic systems, one which communicates where patients are in the process of check-in, being seen by the medical assistants, being seen by the physician, then checking out.

The more detailed, clear, and organized the note, the easier it is for other providers to get an understanding of the patient. Some like to write as much as they can before the visits, others do the majority in the room, my experience as a medical assistant essay still others write their notes after seeing the patient. All doctors, however, have expressed to me the importance of creating an environment conducive to good communication with the patient, as well as their concerns about the barriers that a computer in the room can create.

Communication with the patient is important, but it is also important to communicate well with other health care providers. Since you cannot be present 24 hours a day, many times your note does the talking for you, and if it is inadequate patient care can suffer. While I am getting a lot of practice seeing patients, I have had very little opportunity to do any note writing.

It is a great opportunity to get some practice and direct feedback. Creating the note together can be time consuming, but if it is a slow day, it can be a good learning experience. Organization, teamwork, and communication are the basis for a well-organized practice and the best my experience as a medical assistant essay to provide consistent care for your patients.

Externship Journal

Whether the communication is verbal or written, between you and a patient or you and your colleagues, it is important to be clear and organized. Paying attention to detail and communication while I am in the office has helped me recognize the good habits I need to develop as I continue learning. Tuesday, May 28 Specialties within Family Medicine As a first year medical student, almost everything I see in the clinic is new and exciting to me.

It has been particularly interesting, however, to learn more about each physician I work with and what his or her particular interests are. The FMC sees many obstetrics and gynecology patients on a daily basis, and one of the most interesting aspects of my time here has been getting to know more about this field. I had the opportunity to shadow the physicians in the gynecology clinic as well as those physicians who see primarily OB patients, and I even had my first experience in the delivery room.

Clinically, I learned a lot from these experiences, from screening guidelines to the basics of my experience as a medical assistant essay prenatal visit to monitoring contractions and fetal heart rate during labor. Along the same lines, I also had the opportunity to work with a sports medicine physician, and it was interesting to see how her perspective of primary care differed with her specific training.

Medical Assisting Skills: What You Need to be Confident in Your Career

As my experience as a medical assistant essay athlete, this is definitely another area I am interested in. One of the surprises of this externship has been seeing the diversity within a career in Family Medicine. Many doctors have their own specialties, interests, and skills and seeing that has given me a better appreciation for just how many options there are to shape your own path in Family Medicine.

Wednesday, May 29 Videotaping This week, I had the opportunity to work with one of the behavioral psychologists on the faculty, who was videotaping the residents with their patients and giving feedback. Having just had my own first experience being videotaped with a standardized patient, I can understand that it can be uncomfortable.

But I also understand the value in this practice, as sometimes the best way to improve is to see yourself make a mistake. This particular encounter was an interesting case because the patient had multiple psychiatric issues that made interacting with her and addressing her health needs very complex. As the resident saw the patient, we watched from another room with a checklist detailing things like the important aspects of doing a thorough history, physical, and proper billing, but also the important social aspects of the visit, like establishing a good rapport with the patient and keeping the visit efficient time-wise.

There were many things on that list, and it was a little overwhelming to see them all written out. The resident did a very good job handling the patient, but the visit still got a little off track when the patient, who has a history of doing this, seemed to transfer the responsibility for all her health problems on to a family member.

In this case, it was necessary for the physician to change her normal approach and demeanor with the patient. It was interesting to watch the visit through the eyes of a psychologist and try to come up with some of my own constructive feedback. It was also a unique case, and I appreciated the skill the resident showed in dealing with a complicated visit.

Medical assistant skills you need to succeed

This was a change of pace and a learning experience that I appreciated, as I know I will continue to have evaluations like these throughout my career. I knew Family Medicine Physicians saw a wide variety of patients, but I think it is difficult to appreciate just how varied their schedules are until you actually spend an entire day in the clinic.

I am always impressed by the way the physicians can shift gears between patients. When you are a primary care physician, you are on the front lines of a patient care, as you are generally the first person to address all their health concerns.

You are also then responsible for managing those concerns, sometimes even after patients have been seen by specialists. The end result can be very confusing to watch as a first year medical student.

  • Avoid overly controversial topics;
  • What skills are employers looking for in medical assisting candidates?
  • Additional Tips for a Successful Medical School Essay Regardless of the prompt, you should always address the question of why you want to go to medical school in your essay;
  • My least favorite responsibility is collections;
  • During my stay, I also got to know the various doctors and nurses in the hospital on a personal level;
  • Sample answers I love to help people, and I always wanted to work in healthcare.

Sometimes problem lists and medication lists are long and complicated, and symptoms can be physical, psychological, or a combination thereof.

Family Physicians have to consider many factors when deciding how to best treat their patients, factors that go beyond just the clinical guidelines. Each patient has a unique social situation that can affect the care they are getting or their ability to comply with treatment. Sometimes these complications can make the simplest treatment a challenge, and a good Family Physician is able to recognize and deal with those issues.

Health considerations vary greatly as patients move through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and then begin the aging process. Along with the health concerns, the social and emotional concerns change as well. There are barriers to providing patient education at each stage of life.

  1. Communication with the patient is important, but it is also important to communicate well with other health care providers. It was also a way to help me pay for college.
  2. I sincerely hope to begin the next phase of my journey at Brown University.
  3. While some of the more clinically-oriented presentations have been over my head, it has still been valuable to watch the faculty members teach and hear the questions and thought processes of the other physicians. We are slowly learning that procedures and drugs are not always universally effective.

As the child grows, the physician must continue to work with caregivers but also start educating the child to begin taking responsibility for their health. Moving into adolescence brings many new health and emotional wellness concerns and additional components are added to the physical exam.

With adult patients, physicians are often faced with more complex problems and chronic conditions that require stricter management.