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Essays and studies by members of the english association

  • I remember being taken aback when I first joined ALA and ACRL, that there was no sanctioned group for English and American literature librarians, for I have always felt that a library's heart was its literature collection;
  • Long Will, Dante, and the righteous heathen;
  • Yet Claudia Kreklau achieved just that, and we hope she will continue to nurture that skill as she advances in her career;
  • By Members of the English Association;
  • A fascinating contribution to our understandings of the conceptualization of nature and technology, with important implications for scholars of film, literature and theater, Mr.

Manuscripts may be submitted in English or German, and must not have been published in any form or have been accepted for publication. Papers should be 6, words in length. The decision was very easy, with all judges independently coming to the same verdict.

BIBLIO-NOTES

Most immediately, the essay stood out for its clear organization, its accessible, lucid writing, and its deep level of research. Each of the reviewers independently noted that they could understand this essay even though the topic was beyond their own area of expertise.

Essays and Studies. By Members of the English Association. Vol.

I would like to highlight that this—understandability—was a key reason for the unanimous nomination, because presenting research such that a wide audience can follow and find it interesting is a skill that is sometimes underappreciated in the academic world. Yet Claudia Kreklau achieved just that, and we hope she will continue to nurture that skill as she advances in her career.

Essays and studies; by members of the English Association

For the overwhelming majority of human existence, the sea was perceived as threatening, and creatures inhabiting that world below water were seen as ugly and horrid. Early naturalists encountered fish only in their dead form—slimy, pale, and smelly—and so it is not surprising that early representations of fish, in books, for instance, reflect that unpleasant perception. However, as this essay shows, between andperceptions of fish changed.

Book and Essay Awards

Technological advances in printing with color plates contributed to that, as it became possible to depict fish in life-like colors. Advances in seafaring technology and underwater exploration, making travel safer and allowing more easily to observe fish alive in their natural surroundings surely were just as important for this shift in attitudes.

  1. Among the other essays in the volume may be mentioned a detailed examina- tion of "A Lover's Complaint," by Professor Mackail, and a paper upon "Blake's Religious Lyrics," by the Dean of Norwich. Rhyme in English poetry.
  2. On the teaching of case.
  3. Sentiment and sensibility in the 18th century novel. If criticism and theory are a dialogue, then the most lively stage is the journal in which article can be quickly followed by counter-article, letters respond, dispute, and elaborate, and announcements of new books and upcoming conferences keep readers informed about the whole field.
  4. And vihen Professor Murray comes to his remarks upon the Elizabethan lyrics he shows we can say no less. Reason and enthusiasm in the eighteenth century.
  5. Sentiment and sensibility in the 18th century novel.

The essay is based on a wealth of records and sources from all across Europe, including publications, scientific cabinet collections, and travel accounts. Whether one comes from the angle of the historian, or literary scholar, or naturalist, this essay offers innovative and persuasive perspectives on the intersection of the natural world with technology and human intervention.

As Keklau shows, the emerging perception of the natural world shows many parallels in different cultural settings. Characteristic for central Europe is that here, attitudes toward the natural world were shaped by aesthetics and romanticism more than elsewhere in Europe. The GSA congratulates her for her excellent achievement and thanks the selection committee for its outstanding work. Here is the text of the committee's laudatio: The exploration of this configuration, and the factors contributing to it, is hugely impressive in its intellectual breadth and depth.

With its transnational and transdisciplinary reach, this paper is exemplary for the kind of scholarship the German Studies Association aims to foster. Brecht, Benjamin, and Renger Patzsch on Photography. The GSA congratulates him for his excellent achievement and thanks the selection committee for its outstanding work.

  • The decision was very easy, with all judges independently coming to the same verdict;
  • This world's ideas of the next.

With his well crafted and insightful essay, "Simply Reproducing Reality: Brecht, Benjamin, and Renger Patzsch on Photography," Carl Gelderloos casts new light on contemporary debates over visual culture by reassessing some of the initial discussions on aesthetics, visual representation and technology during that iconic moment of cultural modernity, Weimar Germany.

Highlighting the central place of a self consciously modern photography in Weimar era discourses on aesthetics and culture, Mr. Gelderloos brilliantly constructs a debate between Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht, on the one hand, and a noted proponent of Neue Sachlichkeit in photography, Albert Ranger Patzsch, on the other, in order to expose the considerable reluctance of Weimar's cultural critics to embrace photography as a form of modern art and as an acceptable medium for representing reality.

External Prizes

A fascinating contribution to our understandings of the conceptualization of nature and technology, with important implications for scholars of film, literature and theater, Mr. Gelderloos's essay also sharpens our awareness of the considerable gains, but also challenges, involved in bringing photography into the practice of writing history.

Linden reads Die letzten Tage both as a satirical indictment of World War I and as a kind of handbook on satire as a literary form. Linden on his excellent work.

  • On present state of English pronunciation;
  • Published for The English Association;
  • Collected by Helen Darbishire;
  • Especially now, as both the discipline of English and American literature, and the profession of librarianship, are expanding their scope and changing so rapidly, we need more than ever a place to discuss ideas and developments, and our members bring fresh energy to the task.