College papers help


Portraying your personality in the way you maintain your car

Getty Images There are so many actions throughout your day that go unremembered--pulling off a few sheets of toilet paper, sending a quick email to a colleaguepicking up toiletries at the drugstore.

How a Car Defines Your Personality?

We dug up psychological research and expert opinion on what different daily habits might reveal about you. Note that none of this information is definitive, and that these general findings might not apply to you specifically. Rather, they can provide starting points for learning more about your own and others' motivations. Your shopping habits may reveal your preference for detail A visit to the drugstore could tell you a whole lot about the person you're with.

That first type of consumer is what scientists call an "explanation fiend"; the second is an "explanation foe.

Explanation foes, on the other hand, score low on measures of cognitive reflection, meaning they don't do well with so many details and prefer more general information. The way you hang toilet paper may reveal how assertive you are Relationship expert Gilda Carle surveyed 2,000 men and women about the way they hang their toilet paper. She also asked them to fill out surveys about how assertive they were in their relationships.

Specifically, slow eaters generally like to be in control and know how to appreciate life. Fast eaters tend to be ambitious, goal-oriented, open to new experiences, and often impatient. Adventurous eaters probably like to step out of their comfort zones, while picky eaters are likely neurotic in different areas of their lives. Finally, those who separate different foods on their plate are inclined to be detail oriented and disciplined. For example, we associate looser gaits with extroversion and adventurousness, and see clipped walkers as more neurotic.

  1. You may have high self-efficacy in being successful academically, but low self-efficacy in relation to your ability to fix your car.
  2. Interestingly, the study also found that introverts--people who expressed feelings of shyness and bashfulness--were less likely to be addicted to their phones. Note that none of this information is definitive, and that these general findings might not apply to you specifically.
  3. Before giving the test to applicants, the company could give it to existing employees to find out the traits that are most important for success in this particular company and job. The affective underpinnings of job perceptions and attitudes.
  4. Those who file and delete emails as soon as they receive them may have a greater need for control and order in their lives. Personnel Psychology, 58, 859—891.

But those assumptions are generally wrong. When asked why they made their judgments, many said they could tell by the way the person walked.

Instead, it's probably because we shift our language when we're interested in someone. Writing in Fast Companypsychologist Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic says that extroverts are more likely to talk about fun-related things, like music and parties.

People with lower emotional intelligence tend to use emotional and negative words, such as "depressed" and "angry.

Portraying your personality in the way you maintain your car

The perfectionist won't leave the house until everything is in order. The crisis maker gets a high from racing to meet the deadline. The defier is rebelling against authority and societal norms. The dreamer is overly optimistic about how much they can get done in a certain amount of time.

Credit score simulator

Interestingly, the study also found that introverts--people who expressed feelings of shyness and bashfulness--were less likely to be addicted to their phones. Those who file and delete emails as soon as they receive them may have a greater need for control and order in their lives. Those who save emails--meaning they read them but don't delete them--may be perfectionists, who think they'll get around to addressing those messages eventually.

Lastly, those who leave emails unread, without filing or deleting them, may feel overwhelmed. Alternatively, they may also be smart because they recognize that reading those emails isn't helping them make substantive progress.

Jul 7, 2016 More from Inc.