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2 camp during internment japanese papers research war world

Major General Henry C.

2 camp during internment japanese papers research war world

Pratt announced that beginning January 2nd, 1945, the federal government would officially end the exclusion order that prevented Japanese and Japanese-Americans from returning to the West Coast following their release from World War II internment camps. Though white racism limited their job opportunities, many Japanese and Japanese-Americans found relative success as entrepreneurs and business owners, particularly as farmers and hotel owners and managers.

There were also many young Japanese and Japanese-Americans that were highly educated. Through the JACL, Japanese and Japanese-Americans promoted civil rights more through community education and mutual aid and less through confrontational politics or protest. With the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in December of 1941, the United States government began to investigate and arrest leading Japanese and Japanese-American citizens, who they suspected of espionage.

Despite finding no evidence of a feared West Coast espionage network, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which authorized the removal of 110,000 Japanese and Japanese-Americans from the west coast to ten inland internment camps. In January, 1942 more than 7,000 Seattle area Japanese and Japanese-Americans were forced from their homes and sent to the camps.

The story of the removal and incarceration of Japanese and Japanese Americans in internment camps during World War II is well documented elsewhere.

For personal stories about this topic, see the interviews in Densho: Though 2 camp during internment japanese papers research war world formed during the war, their most active periods, at least according to newspaper accounts in the Seattle Times, Seattle Post Intelligencer, and the Seattle Star, were during the debate over resettlement at the end of 1944 and in early 1945.

The anti-Japanese groups used methods such as flyers and word of mouth to gain members. They also used newspapers to generate publicity by writing letters to the editors. Art Ritchie, a member of the Japanese Exclusion League, wrote a letter Senator Magnuson in January 1945 hoping to get an amendment to the Constitution to prevent Japanese immigrants from becoming citizens, and invited the Senator to join the JEL.

These types of leagues, which were formed in the beginning of the war, inspired the founding of similar groups in other areas near Seattle The Remember the Pearl Harbor League was a group of farmers and businessmen mainly from the Auburn valley area.

They were an anti-Japanese group that protested the resettlement of the Japanese and Japanese-Americans back to the west coast. The Japs must not come back. He owned a local newspaper in Sumner called the Standard.

2 camp during internment japanese papers research war world

This time, however, the League ran into some opposition, with defense worker R. In Seattlethe League failed to establish a branch chapter. Some members drew a distinction between immigrant and American-born Japanese Americans, opposing the return of the older generation, while acknowledging that the American had the right to live wherever they liked.

2 camp during internment japanese papers research war world

Critics claimed that the main goal was to keep Japanese out because they wanted the farmland that the Japanese farmers had owned. It seems like the League came up with these reasons to cover the actual reasons that they did not want Japanese and Japanese-Americans to return. These farmers and businessmen from the Auburn valley feared the return of the Japanese and Japanese-Americans because of the economic impacts it would cause them.

The Japanese and Japanese-Americans had been prosperous farmers and businessmen before the war. Critics also claimed that they were more interested in dues than anything else. Opponents of groups like the Remember Pearl Harbor League used newspapers to warn people not to join anti-Japanese organizations that required a fee, saying that they were just out to make a quick buck. They also tried to stigmatize anti-Japanese groups as racist by comparing them to Hitler and the Ku-Klux Klan.

The Seattle Council of Churches was an important organization with the return of the Japanese and Japanese-Americans to the west coast. The Council of Churches helped by first assisting the Japanese and Japanese-Americans in its struggle to re-establish themselves back onto the west coast. They educated the city on Christian virtues of hospitality and acceptance, hoping it would cause people to accept the Japanese and Japanese-Americans back. The Council also chastised the Governor for all his anti-Japanese remarks and well as other anti-Japanese organizations.

The council established hotels to function as temporary housing and it also created the United Church Ministry.

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  4. In Seattle , the League failed to establish a branch chapter.

The Council also set up a program in the community by sending out enlistment cards. People could sign up to sponsor and provide temporary or permanent housing to the Japanese and Japanese-Americans. This program was overwhelmingly successful, many people were expressing their willingness to accept and bring back the Japanese and Japanese-Americans to the west coast.

With all the unity in the community, anti-Japanese groups were finding it more difficult to survive. The Committee was established in February of 1944 partly to help ease racial tensions related to increased African American migration during the war.

But the Committee also, unlike similar committees in other cities in the North, protected Japanese and Japanese-American rights upon their return to the West Coast.

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  4. Despite finding no evidence of a feared West Coast espionage network, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which authorized the removal of 110,000 Japanese and Japanese-Americans from the west coast to ten inland internment camps.

Before the Japanese resettlement, the CUC was one of several organizations which publicly fought the anti-Japanese groups. They also criticized the Governor for his remarks opposing the Japanese and Japanese-Americans and his wild claims about secret Japanese societies. When the Japanese and Japanese-Americans returned in 1945, the CUC received partial credit because of their work to promote a tolerant public policy and political culture.

This group was concerned with the over-all welfare of the Japanese community. One member of this organization was Floyd Schmoe, a University.