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Summary of book louis auchincloss theodore roosevelt

Brands, Cooper Square Press: It suggests a nation permanently swaddled in amiable memories of the past. Kennedy, Watergate or Sept. But this is quite wrong. The striking thing is not how pacific but how volatile the U. Domestically, the country's past could be described as a series of economic booms and busts with successive waves of immigration ensuring ethnic and class conflict.

Nor has the U. From the outset, the United States relentlessly expanded, whether it was during the Mexican War or the conquest of Indian territories. A new superpower had emerged from the conflict intent on increasing its power and influence abroad.

Indeed, the turn of the century was the hinge of fate for the United States. No one did more to turn the republic into an empire than Theodore Roosevelt.

Additional Research Resources about Theodore Roosevelt

Edmund Morris and Louis Auchincloss provide a welcome opportunity to take a fresh look at Roosevelt. No, Morris does not appear as a fictitious character, as in his biography of Ronald Reagan. Here, Morris draws on the documents at hand, although in his zeal to create vivid drama, he sometimes embellishes historical fact with his own fanciful visions.

He minutely traces Roosevelt's two tumultuous terms as president, beginning with his unexpected ascension in 1901 following the assassination of William McKinley. It's all there, more or less: Roosevelt's views on race, his famous dinner in the White House with Booker T.

  1. A master craftsman's rendering of a character who needs no embellishment. Auchincloss supports such propositions so fluidly as to make yet another book on TR well worth reading.
  2. Domestically, the country's past could be described as a series of economic booms and busts with successive waves of immigration ensuring ethnic and class conflict. A master craftsman's rendering of a character who needs no embellishment.
  3. The suspicion arises that Morris indulges in no "hindsights" because he has none. His book is filled with penetrating observations.
  4. TR 1858-1919 , he says, embodied numerous contradictions for which he has been periodically pilloried by liberals and conservatives alike.
  5. Responsible for much progressive legislation, he passed the Pure Food and Drug Act, created federal forest lands and obtained antitrust legislation; he was also an aristocrat who was against monopolies because they were not gentlemanly, invaded Panama to build the canal and casually exhibited racism during the Spanish-American War.

Washington, his trust-busting, his grab of the Panama Canal, his negotiation of the 1905 Russo-Japanese Peace Treaty and his buildup of the Navy come in for close scrutiny. Alas, for all its comprehensiveness, Morris' book ends up being something of a cartoon. Each chapter is broken into short scenes; some sections are only two or three sentences long. Morris has created a film script, not a history. There is, for a start, the perfumed prose which draws attention to itself.

Morris offers a Walt Disney view of the high and mighty; the rumbustious Roosevelt, the conniving Sen.

Additional Research Resources about Theodore Roosevelt

Mark Hanna, the retrograde industrialists. Despite its length, Morris' work is curiously perfunctory when it comes to describing the politics of the era. The problem may be revealed by a note at the book's outset: Historical hindsights are confined to the notes. The suspicion arises that Morris indulges in no "hindsights" because he has none.

  • As in his biography of Reagan, "Dutch," he is patently bored by politics;
  • TR 1858-1919 , he says, embodied numerous contradictions for which he has been periodically pilloried by liberals and conservatives alike;
  • Despite its length, Morris' work is curiously perfunctory when it comes to describing the politics of the era.

As in his biography of Reagan, "Dutch," he is patently bored by politics. Instead, he indulges in hero worship.

Standard Bibliographies of Theodore Roosevelt

Roosevelt deserves better treatment. In a little more than 150 pages, he brilliantly analyzes Roosevelt and his presidency. His book is filled with penetrating observations. A graceful writer, Auchincloss explains why Roosevelt became a progressive and sets him in the wider context of his time.

Larger Than Life

It would be hard to think of a better introduction. The letters provide a vivid reminder of Roosevelt's forceful prose and the depth of his reading. For comprehending Roosevelt's volcanic and shrewd temperament, nothing can match reading his correspondence. It would have been hard to think of a more unlikely future candidate for high office than the young "Teedie," as he was known. Bookish and sickly, he suffered repeated asthma attacks and devoted himself to studying natural history.

But a talk with his father prompted him to undertake a strenuous course in calisthenics at age 12, from which he never deviated.

Articles & Editorials written by Theodore Roosevelt

The martial spirit seems to have been present from the outset; his great disappointment as a lad was that his father did not fight in the Civil War but paid someone to take his place. Auchincloss believes this left a lasting mark on Roosevelt.

  1. For those who aren't familiar with Roosevelt's career, this precis is a perfect alternative to the long biographies by Edmund Morris or David McCullough, particularly in arguing for TR's place among the presidential 'greats. A sparkling biographical summary.
  2. A graceful writer, Auchincloss explains why Roosevelt became a progressive and sets him in the wider context of his time.
  3. It suggests a nation permanently swaddled in amiable memories of the past. Bringing all his novelist's skill to the task, Auchincloss recounts the significant contributions of TR's career and administration.
  4. Here are some links to help you. Ever after, he was determined to efface this stain on the family escutcheon.

Ever after, he was determined to efface this stain on the family escutcheon: In Auchincloss' view, "Theodore Jr.